Hyundai Verna Performance & Price

Hyundai Verna Overview

Hyundai Verna has always been a prominent player in the mid-sized sedan segment in the Indian market. It has churned decent moolah for Hyundai in this highly competitive segment, which comprises of heavyweights such as Maruti Ciaz, Honda City, Volkswagen Vento and others. The sales of the Verna sedan dipped concerningly over the past few months as the design was outdated and it missed out on some tempting features as compared to its arch rivals Honda City and Maruti Ciaz, both of whom received a facelifted version with fresh styling and modern features. Therefore, the South-Korean automaker has introduced the next-gen Verna sedan with new styling and sophisticated features to regain the lost ground. The new sedan comes in both petrol and diesel fuel trims with manual as well as automatic transmission. It has been offered in four trim levels: E, EX, SX, and SX (O). The 2017 Hyundai Verna is based on a new architecture, while flaunting a new design and boasting of several first-in-segment features. Hyundai Verna On road price starts from 7,98,266/-. Check for price details of Verna in CarzPrice.

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Hyundai Verna Style

The new Verna is bigger as well as more spacious than its predecessor and also gets a slightly lengthier wheelbase which automatically translates into more interior space. The new car also underpins a new reworked Hyundai i20 platform.

Now let’s talk about the styling, shall we? The old Verna was always one attractive looking sedan, and thus Hyundai decided not to mess too much wi9th the overall silhouette of the car and thus decided to make minimal changes to keep things fresh on the new car. As a result of all that the new generation Verna gets a redesigned headlamps and grille towards the front, the new ‘C’ shaped LED Daytime running lamps has also are integrated into the new headlight unit. The headlight assembly, in particular, gets projector units. The front profile now is dominated by a large cascading Hyundai grille. The front profile also gets new fog lamp cluster which is surrounded by a chrome embellishment. There are not many changes made to the side profile though however, the new sedan does feature a new set of alloy wheels for the top end trim. The swooping roofline towards the rear makes things more interesting. Talking about the rear profile, in particular, it gets this newly designed wrap around tail lamps which look quite similar to the ones found in the new facelift Xcent sedan only slightly bigger. The integrated boot spoiler too helps in adding a sporty appeal to the vehicle.

Hyundai Verna Space

The cabin layout isn’t very different from its stablemates, but that isn’t a bad thing. Interiors are well-appointed and the placement of controls is good. The new steering controls add to the upmarket feel while offering better usability. The quality of plastics is as good as it gets and plastics are nice to the touch with a smooth feel. The 7-inch touchscreen offers a good resolution but a slightly crisper resolution would have been more welcome, particularly for the navigation. The infotainment system offers Apple CarPlay, Android Auto and MirrorLink connectivity.

The ventilated seats deserve a mention as their cooling effect is a boon, and the seats are nicely cushioned and offer good bolstering. The rear bench is comfortable but leg and kneeroom aren’t as generous as some of the competition. The rear seat is a nice place to be in though with its plushness as the height of the arm rest is perfect and the rear air-conditioning vents ensure drafts of cold air reach you well. There’s an additional USB port for rear occupants, a thoughtful addition for the chaueffer driven lot. Storage spaces are abundant with several useful cubby holes, cup holders, a front central arm rest with storage and one-litre bottle holders in all doors.

Boot volume may not be best in class but there’s good amounts of space and I don’t think the average buyer will complain. Another highlight is the remote opening function for the boot, like the Elantra and Tucson – you simply need to stand behind the car for three seconds with the key in your pocket for it to open – which helps a lot when your hands are full.

Hyundai Verna Engine

Hyundai’s Verna will be offered with two engines, not four. The 1.4-litre engines have been shelved altogether. The 1.6-litre petrol and diesel engines have been carried over, but not without tweaks. Though power figures are identical at 123PS (petrol) and 128PS (diesel), Hyundai says that the torque is a lot more accessible. For instance, at 1250rpm you’d have 245Nm of torque on tap, compared to 176Nm in the outgoing Verna 4S diesel. Similar case with the petrol, where it makes a full 7Nm more at 1500rpm compared to the outgoing car that developed 122Nm. There’s a 6-speed manual like before, but, the 4-speed automatic transmission has been ditched in favour of a 6-speed automatic, presumably borrowed from the Creta. We could only sample the diesel avatar of the Verna, but had a go with both the transmissions. Clutch in, thumb the start-stop button, and the engine comes to life with a faint clatter. The engine feels smooth and refined as you start driving. The highlight here is the drivability of the motor, courtesy the torque. You can lug it at 30kmph in third. Step on it, and expect it to build speed cleanly. Much like the little Xcent, power delivery remains linear, save for a small spike in power at around 1700rpm. The diesel should make for a good city car as the clutch is light (albeit springy), and the gearshifts are quick n’ slick.

If you don’t want that hassle altogether, the new automatic gearbox will save the day. It shifts through the gears quickly and just gets the job done. Don’t expect it to be a sporty gearbox that will give you split-second shifts. Think of it rather as convenience and it seems just right for the job. There’s a manual mode too, but it didn’t seem all that engaging to use. It’s best left to its own, really. What’s appreciable, is the fact that the Verna is no longer a skittish handler. Around the skidpad, it remained composed as we chucked it about. Yes, there’s a bit of body roll but it’s predictable. And, we’d say the same thing about the steering as well. It is light, sure – but not dead. It does a good job of telling you what the front wheels are up to. Impressive! We can’t comment on the ride just as yet, but Hyundai tells us the new suspension has been engineered to be more forgiving, more pliant and quieter. It should have no qualms munching highway miles, but we’ll reserve our word on it till we get enough time with the car.

Hyundai Verna driving

Dynamics on the 2018 Hyundai Verna are leagues ahead of the older car. The steering is so much better now. It feels direct but still lacks feedback. At low speeds, it is light enough while it weighs up slightly on the highways. However, it still feels dead and lacks a proper connect. The vehicle remains stable on straights as well as twisty roads alike but doesn’t feel as eager or sure-footed as cars like the Volkswagen Vento and Skoda Rapid. The Verna is a very good cruiser but I wouldn’t call it a fun-to-drive car.

The suspension has been set-up nicely and it gets a mildly stiff setting. It absorbs bumps and potholes well and the car’s body remains fairly composed all the time. If you hit sharp undulations, the suspension does have a tendency to thud. Ground clearance isn’t much of an issue while braking performance is brilliant with the pedal having good bite and generating much better feedback too. The Verna comes with Hankook tyres and grip is satisfactory for regular usage. While the older car used to feel like a boat, this one is completely different.

Hyundai Verna Safety

Here’s where things get really interesting. The Verna gets what’s among our favourite in-cabin features – ventilated seats! It’s the only car in its segment to get it; the next being its elder sibling – the Hyundai Elantra. More hand-me-downs from the bigger Hyundai sedan comes in the form of an electric sunroof, and hands-free boot release that pops open the trunk if you wave your foot underneath the rear bumper. The Verna continues to feature leather upholstery, and the front seats score high in terms of cushioning and comfort. The rear is a compromise in comparison – the legroom isn’t generous and anyone over six feet will be a bit too close to the roof. Seating three, although possible, will be a squeeze. That said, rear occupants are treated to their own air-conditioning vents, a central armrest and a single USB socket to juice up the phone.As far as safety is concerned, the top-spec variant we drove around, featured six airbags. We’re expecting dual airbags and ABS to be standard across the range, as is the case with the refreshed Honda City.

Hyundai Verna Cost

Hyundai Verna Ex-Showroom Price in India ranges from 7,98,266/- (Verna 1.6 VTVT E) to 12,86,192/- (Verna 1.6 CRDI SX Plus AT). Get best offers for Hyundai Verna from Hyundai Dealers in India.

Hyundai Verna Verdict

To put it simply, the Verna’s package has only become stronger. The new design is mature and likeable, and like most Hyundais – it is loaded to the gills as well. Our short spin has us impressed with the drivability of the diesel, and the dynamics when you hustle it. Yes, the interior could’ve looked a lot less simpler and some more room at the back would’ve made it the perfect package. But, that doesn’t take away from the fact that Verna will catapult right to the top of the consideration list for the self-driven lot. It isn’t going to be easy, but Hyundai does look well-prepped to slug it out with the updated Honda City and the to-be updated Maruti Ciaz.

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